Silent, Brutal and Imminent Death: Consequences of Depleted Uranium Shells Usage

The use of DU shells led to a surge of cancer in Iraqi children. In this photo you can see a boy waiting for chemotherapy. He was born blind and suffers from a brain tumor. The cancer has spread to his abdomen, causing it to swell.

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The use of DU shells led to a surge of cancer in Iraqi children. In this photo you can see a boy waiting for chemotherapy. He was born blind and suffers from a brain tumor. The cancer has spread to his abdomen, causing it to swell.

© AP Photo / Enric Marti

Four-year-old Alla Saleem, who suffers from a tumor in her eye, lies on her bed as she waits for medication at the Ghazwan Children's Hospital in the southern Iraqi town of Basra, about 60 kilometers (37 miles) from the border with Kuwait. Iraqi authorities claim that about 300 tons of bombs with depleted uranium were used by the allied forces during the Gulf War bombing campaign, and this caused the increase of cancer cases in the area. According to Doctor Jawal Al-Ali, chief cancer consultant of the Basra teaching hospital and member of the Royal College of Physicians in London, these cases have multiplied by 12 since 1991.

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Four-year-old Alla Saleem, who suffers from a tumor in her eye, lies on her bed as she waits for medication at the Ghazwan Children's Hospital in the southern Iraqi town of Basra, about 60 kilometers (37 miles) from the border with Kuwait. Iraqi authorities claim that about 300 tons of bombs with depleted uranium were used by the allied forces during the Gulf War bombing campaign, and this caused the increase of cancer cases in the area. According to Doctor Jawal Al-Ali, chief cancer consultant of the Basra teaching hospital and member of the Royal College of Physicians in London, these cases have multiplied by 12 since 1991.

© Photo : Frederik Coghe/Bradley Dodd/Adiabatic shear bands

A tank destroyed by a depleted uranium shell during course of Second Gulf War. Even if some of the crewmembers survived the explosion, chances are they died later of cancer.

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A tank destroyed by a depleted uranium shell during course of Second Gulf War. Even if some of the crewmembers survived the explosion, chances are they died later of cancer.

© AP Photo / Hidajet delic

NATO used depleted uranium munitions during the airstrikes against Bosnian Serbs in 1995 and during the air campaign in Kosovo against Yugoslavia in 1999.

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NATO used depleted uranium munitions during the airstrikes against Bosnian Serbs in 1995 and during the air campaign in Kosovo against Yugoslavia in 1999.

© AP Photo / Visar Kryeziu

Portuguese and Italian KFOR soldiers measure radiation levels near a Yugoslav Army tank destroyed during NATO's bombing campaign, in the western Kosovo town of Klina.

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Portuguese and Italian KFOR soldiers measure radiation levels near a Yugoslav Army tank destroyed during NATO's bombing campaign, in the western Kosovo town of Klina.

© AP Photo / Hidajet Delic

NATO and US command never told their soldiers about the healths risks, associated with DU. So they did not take precautionary measures while coming into contact with these projectiles.

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NATO and US command never told their soldiers about the healths risks, associated with DU. So they did not take precautionary measures while coming into contact with these projectiles.

© AFP 2023 / Stan Honda

In this photo you can see a US Army Specialist handling 25mm rounds of depleted uranium ammunition with bare hands.

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In this photo you can see a US Army Specialist handling 25mm rounds of depleted uranium ammunition with bare hands.

© AP Photo / Vadim Ghirda

As a result, there was a surge of leukemia cases among soldiers who served in Iraq and Yugoslavia.

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As a result, there was a surge of leukemia cases among soldiers who served in Iraq and Yugoslavia.

© AP Photo / Boris Grdanoski

DU contained in bombs used during NATO's air campaign in Yugoslavia will remain in the soil for billions of years, filtering into ground, water and moving into the food chain.

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DU contained in bombs used during NATO's air campaign in Yugoslavia will remain in the soil for billions of years, filtering into ground, water and moving into the food chain.

© AP Photo / Hrvoje Knez

Everyone who came in contact with DU shells must undergo a number of check-ups.

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Everyone who came in contact with DU shells must undergo a number of check-ups.

© AP Photo / Amel Emric

Radiation from DU shells contaminates not only the soil but

almost everything.

In this photo you can see soldier measuring the radiation levels of weapons and army equipment at a military factory in the eastern Bosnian town of Bratunac. The factory was targeted during the 1995 NATO airstrikes.

Reportedly, short after that its workers started dying of unknown causes.

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Radiation from DU shells contaminates not only the soil but

almost everything.

In this photo you can see soldier measuring the radiation levels of weapons and army equipment at a military factory in the eastern Bosnian town of Bratunac. The factory was targeted during the 1995 NATO airstrikes.

Reportedly, short after that its workers started dying of unknown causes.

© AP Photo / Visar Kryeziu

A Yugoslav Army tank destroyed by NATO DU shells. It will emmanate radiation for centuries.

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A Yugoslav Army tank destroyed by NATO DU shells. It will emmanate radiation for centuries.

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